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Coercion and Rights – Simply Philosophy

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In the two previous posts I have shown that a common anarchist argument against taxes fails and that the community may morally obtain your property, even if you must be coerced to do so. So it is simple to show that coercion is sometimes permissible in the case of property rights. Governments also claim the … Continue reading Coercion and Rights – Simply Philosophy

Community Assistance | Simply Philosophy

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In a previous post, I explained that a common anarchist argument against taxes fails. But that does not mean that taxes are moral. It just means that one argument against taxes fails. This is my positive argument for taxes (or something like them). I will say upfront that this argument does not justify the taking … Continue reading Community Assistance | Simply Philosophy

Are Taxes Moral? | Simply Philosophy

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One of the arguments against the existence of special government powers such as the power to tax is that taxing is no different from theft. Since theft is wrong, so is taxing. A careful examination of this argument shows that it assumes that there is no moral difference between an individual under government and an … Continue reading Are Taxes Moral? | Simply Philosophy

Encouraging Respect | Simply Philosophy

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In my previous post, I showed that objectively offensive speech falls into two categories. False speech can be punished by law, while disrespectful speech cannot be. Free speech by itself cannot solve the problem of a lack of respect in speech, but neither can any law. Laws only make the situation worse. Respect can only … Continue reading Encouraging Respect | Simply Philosophy

Reasons to Restrict Free Speech | Simply Philosophy

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I have given two lines of argument to support free speech. But many people believe that free speech should be limited or restricted in some circumstances. I am not speaking of restrictions that are voluntary (such as politeness) but restrictions that are involuntary. These restrictions include restrictions for reasons of hate, offensiveness, sensitivity, practicality and … Continue reading Reasons to Restrict Free Speech | Simply Philosophy

Selfless Reasons to Support Free Speech | Simply Philosophy

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I have explained why free speech is a good idea if you wish to convince other people of the truth of your position. But it is also something that you should support even if you do not know what the true position is. Free speech helps those who do not know the correct position because … Continue reading Selfless Reasons to Support Free Speech | Simply Philosophy

Sentences and Definitions | Simply Philosophy

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I have finished my discussion of self-evident concepts. Concepts do not do anything except refer to things in our experience. They must be combined in order to be of any use. There are exactly two ways to combine concepts. They may be combined as a definition or as a sentence. The difference between a definition … Continue reading Sentences and Definitions | Simply Philosophy

Particulars and Universals | Simply Philosophy

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The problem with names is that they can always be applied to more than one thing. But the existence of unique individuals is self-evident. It is these two facts that create a puzzle for philosophers. Anything that can be applied in many cases is a universal. But something that is unique is a particular. But … Continue reading Particulars and Universals | Simply Philosophy

One of the early questions that I asked is whether or not self-evident truths are sufficient to build a proper philosophy on. I whether or not there is a method to determine self-evident truths. I think that these questions are related. There is no a priori method to determine whether or not self-evident truths are … Continue reading Are Self-Evident Truths Sufficient? | Simply Philosophy

Sometimes people disagree over whether or not a truth is self-evident. Some people that the statement is true, but not self-evident. Others believe that the statement is false. In either case, they do not believe that the statement is self-evident. Unless there is a fair and logical way to adjudicate this disagreement, it will not … Continue reading Disagreement and Self-Evident Truth | Simply Philosophy