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Ownership

This describes the nature of ownership, theft, and property, the justification of such and the limits of such. Defense of the idea that ” intellectual property” does not exist is also included.

Creator’s Rights

So far, I have discussed three objections to the first argument for copyright. I think that it should be quite clear that the argument is a failure. However, the second argument is much stronger and more frequently used. The second argument claims that ” creators” have a right to what they create. The so-called right of creators to what they create does not exist as such. When someone ...

Tokens, Types and Ownership

In a previous post, I explained why being the creator of something does not lead to ownership over it. But suppose that a writer did own a book. Does that help copyright or not? It does not help because the writer only owns a token of the book rather than a type. Since ownership never applies to types, ownership of information is impossible. A token is always a particular thing. A type is a kind o...

Copyright is Morally Unjustified

Previously, I have discussed the two major arguments for copyright and have given arguments against them. Without a positive argument for copyright, the government is not morally justified in creating copyright. The lack of moral justification does not mean that we are permitted to violate copyright law. It simply means that we are morally justified in opposing all forms of copyright, speaking out...

Copyright is Theft

I have already shown that copyright is not morally justified. I have also shown that copyright is not in the common good. Earlier I showed that it was only permissible for the government to take from individuals or organizations if something were in the common good. Since copyright is an instance of taking that is not in the common good, copyright is theft. When you buy something such as a CD from...